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The Memory Police
$22.00

The Memory Police

By Yoko Ozawa
288 Pages
Paperback
July 2020

Finalist for the International Booker Prize and the National Book Award

A haunting Orwellian novel about the terrors of state surveillance, from the acclaimed author of The Housekeeper and the Professor.

On an unnamed island, objects are disappearing: first hats, then ribbons, birds, roses. . . . Most of the inhabitants are oblivious to these changes, while those few able to recall the lost objects live in fear of the draconian Memory Police, who are committed to ensuring that what has disappeared remains forgotten. When a young writer discovers that her editor is in danger, she concocts a plan to hide him beneath her f loorboards, and together they cling to her writing as the last way of preserving the past. Powerful and provocative, The Memory Police is a stunning novel about the trauma of loss.

ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
THE NEW YORK TIMES * THE WASHINGTON POST * TIME * CHICAGO TRIBUNE * THE GUARDIAN * ESQUIRE * THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS * FINANCIAL TIMES * LIBRARY JOURNAL * THE A.V. CLUB * KIRKUS REVIEWS * LITERARY HUB

“Unforgettable. . . . A masterful work of speculative fiction.” —Chicago Tribune

“Ogawa’s fable echoes the themes of George Orwell’s 1984, Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, and Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, but it has a voice and power all its own.” —Time

“A masterpiece. . . . A novel that makes us see differently. . . . It is a rare work of patient and courageous vision.” —The Guardian

“A feat of dark imagination . . . an intimate, suspenseful drama of courage and endurance.” —The Wall Street Journal

“[A] masterly novel.” —The New Yorker

“An elegantly spare dystopian fable. . . . It tingles with dread.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Quietly devastating . . . Ogawa finds new ways to express old anxieties about authoritarianism, environmental depredation and humanity’s willingness to be complicit in its own demise.” —The Washington Post

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